Angular's DI

The last example introduced a hypothetical Injector object. Angular simplifies DI even further. With Angular, programmers almost never have to get bogged down with injection details.

Angular's DI system is (mostly) controlled through @NgModule. Specifically the providers and declarations array. (declarations is where we put components, pipes and directives; providers is where we put services)

For example:

import { Injectable, NgModule } from '@angular/core';
@Component({
// ...
})
class ChatWidget {
constructor(private authService: AuthService, private authWidget: AuthWidget,
private chatSocket: ChatSocket) {}
}
@NgModule({
declarations: [ ChatWidget ]
})
export class AppModule {
};

In the above example the AppModule is told about the ChatWidget class. Another way of saying this is that Angular has been provided a ChatWidget.

That seems pretty straightforward, but astute readers will be wondering how Angular knows how to build ChatWidget. What if ChatWidget was a string, or a plain function?

Angular assumes that it's being given a class.

What about AuthService, AuthWidget and ChatSocket? How is ChatWidget getting those?

It's not, at least not yet. Angular does not know about them yet. That can be changed easily enough:

import { Injectable, NgModule } from '@angular/core';
@Component({
// ...
})
class ChatWidget {
constructor(private authService: AuthService, private authWidget: AuthWidget,
private chatSocket: ChatSocket) {}
}
@Component({
// ...
})
class AuthWidget {}
@Injectable()
class AuthService {}
@Injectable()
class ChatSocket {}
@NgModule({
declarations[ ChatWidget, AuthWidget ]
providers: [ AuthService, ChatSocket ],
})

Okay, this is starting to look a little bit more complete. Although it's still unclear how ChatWidget is being told about its dependencies. Perhaps that is related to those odd @Injectable statements.